Challah Cover Roundup

 I’ve stumbled upon so many lovely modern and stylish challah covers lately. I’ve rounded them up and featured my favorites below.

Do you have a favorite challah cover you use regularly for Shabbat?

The Blossom Rose Challah Cover is designed by Tamara Zlotogoura. Zlotogoura is currently living and working in Alicante, Spain. She is inspired by nature’s splendor and it's rejuvenation cycle. The seven stamens within each flower represent the cyclic nature of the natural world and G-d's creation. The Prunus Sargentii plant during Spring time is featured. Fabric Composition : 76% cotton / 24% Linen.

The Blossom Rose Challah Cover is designed by Tamara Zlotogoura who lives and works in Alicante, Spain. She is inspired by nature’s splendor and it’s rejuvenation cycle. The seven stamens within each flower in this cover represent the cyclic nature of the natural world and G-d’s creation. Material : 76% cotton / 24% Linen.

Grape Leaf and Wheat Challah Cover by Tina Davis. Inspired by the Shabbat ritual dinner, Davis chose the shape of the grape leaf for the cover to represent the kiddush, the prayer over wine sanctifying Shabbat, and then had the cover hand embroidered with a wheat design to represent the blessing over the bread. Each cover is made with the finest linen, which has been cut to shape, and has been pre-washed and pressed by the artist in Israel. The cover is then hand-finished and embroidered by specially selected artisans in Thailand. Every cover includes a handsome, natural cardboard portfolio for storage. 

Grape Leaf and Wheat Challah Cover by Tina Davis. Davis chose the shape of the grape leaf to represent the kiddush, and the hand embroidered cover with a wheat design to represent the blessing over the bread. Each cover is made with the finest linen, which has been cut to shape, and has been pre-washed and pressed by the artist in Israel. It’s then hand-finished and embroidered by specially selected artisans in Thailand. Every cover includes a handsome, natural cardboard portfolio for storage.

Vintage French Fabric Heirloom Wedding Challah Cover with Crocheted Edges. Handmade by Jennifer Raichman. Materials: silk ribbon, embroidery, and linen. Made to order.

Vintage French Fabric Heirloom Wedding Challah Cover with Crocheted Edges. Handmade by Jennifer Raichman. Materials: silk ribbon, embroidery, and linen. Made to order.

Hand Woven Challah Cover by Israeli weaver Ori Faran.   “Shabbat” in Hebrew is embroidered in the middle of the cover. Made from fine cotton threads, carefully handwoven on traditional looms in Israel. The weavers have a special prayer before and during the weaving so each one of their products is full of good energy and love. Size: 55/50cm. The size and colors can be customized.

Hand Woven Challah Cover by Israeli weaver Ori Faran. “Shabbat” in Hebrew is embroidered in the middle of the cover. Made from fine cotton threads, carefully handwoven on traditional looms in Israel. The weavers have a special prayer before and during the weaving so each one of their products is full of good energy and love. The size and colors can be customized.

From top left: This simple, beautiful cover conceals a round challah under four separate "petals" that are unfolded after the blessing. Each cover is handmade and hand-finished with mercerised cotton and 100% natural Belgian linen. Generously-sized for large holiday loaves (25" diameter). The Round Challah Cover features an abstract Star of David in mercerized cotton ently fringed 100% Belgian linen Bottom: The Star of David is woven on the top in mercerized cotton thread. All challah covers by Lake House Linens' David Zrihen exclusively for Fig Tree & Vine.

From top left: This simple, beautiful Petal Challah Cover conceals a round challah under four separate “petals” that are unfolded after the blessing. Each cover is handmade and hand-finished with mercerized cotton and 100% natural Belgian linen and generously-sized for large holiday loaves (25″ diameter). The Round Challah Cover (top right) features an abstract Star of David in mercerized cotton in gently fringed 100% Belgian linen. Bottom: The Star of David Challah Covers are woven in mercerized cotton thread. All four challah covers are made by Lake House Linens’ David Zrihen exclusively for Fig Tree & Vine.

Challah Cover in Brown with Geometric Design and “Shabbat” embroidered in Hebrew in the center. Around the Hebrew is a white frame with gold edging, and a blue scalloped rectangle.

Challah Cover in Brown with Geometric Design and “Shabbat” embroidered in Hebrew in the center. Around the Hebrew is a white frame with gold edging, and a blue scalloped rectangle.

Challah Cover by Bulurru Aboriginal artist Peter Marshall. Printed cotton, décor golden thread embroidery and backing white cotton

Challah Cover by Bulurru Aboriginal artist Peter Marshall. Printed cotton, décor golden thread embroidery and backing white cotton.

The Hamotzi Challah Cover is created by artisans at Kibbutz Beit HaEmek, which is in northern Israel, in the western Galilee. It's handpainted on 100% silk.

The Hamotzi Challah Cover is created by artisans at Kibbutz Beit HaEmek, which is in northern Israel, in the western Galilee. It’s handpainted on 100% silk.

 Spiral Shabbat Greeting Challah Cover from Danke Judaica will set a striking tone for your Shabbat table. Material: matt polyester satin

This Spiral Shabbat Greeting Challah Cover from Danke Judaica will set a striking tone for your Shabbat table. Material: matt polyester satin

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3 Comments on Challah Cover Roundup

  1. David
    July 25, 2016 at 9:42 pm (11 months ago)

    Great find!! These are really beautiful!! Where do you find these? Thank you for sharing..

    Reply
    • Julie Levine
      July 25, 2016 at 9:52 pm (11 months ago)

      Click the name of the challah cover (in blue) and it will take you right to the site for purchasing.

      Reply
  2. Name*
    August 28, 2016 at 5:37 am (10 months ago)

    I have a few lovely hallah covers. But the ones I use regularly are the ones made by my girls when they were 5-6-7 years old in Sunday school. Isn’t that funny. But now that they are no longer living at home, it is comforting, especially on shabbat, to recall the how-when-where when we used the ones they made.
    Thanks.

    Reply

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